A Superpower For Designers

A superpower for designers  |  Dream Kitchen Builders

Augmented Reality could transform the design/build industry.

If any industry could benefit from technology, it’s construction, but we have never been known to be early adopter or even mainstream users of technology. But the design/build world is ripe for tech innovation; we design and built in front of our buyers, and we work in diverse, mobile and typically scattered teams of professionals. 

We need the technology in our industry to be mobile, image oriented, simple and inexpensive. Designers and builders are now integrating products and technology from all over the world -- since consumers are now shopping in a global marketplace -- and we need the latest and most creative tools to manage this.  

 

What is Augmented Reality?

Augmented Reality (AR) is a composite of real-world and virtual data like images and videos and can include perceptual data like audio, measurements, depth perception and geolocation. AR can help designers automate processes and build prototypes easier and faster by using virtual images that are scaled correctly. It can bring teams together in real-time design meetings even though they may each be in remote locations. 

The top AR-use cases for designers and contractors:

  • Shared Experiences by Apple will be available this fall through Apple’s ARKit 2 on Apple devices. Multiple users such as clients, designers, builders and architects will be able to collaborate on the same virtual image superimposed on a real-world image in real time — on different devices. 
  • On-site job management and record keeping via mobile apps will speed things up and keep the team on the same page and will also automatically update your records. 
  • AR can be used on a jobsite to measure, scale, notate and share via chat.
  • Video conferencing with real + virtual images in the real world (live on everyone’s screen in real time) can be helpful for design meetings, change orders and troubleshooting.


Helpful AR Apps: 

-  Augment. The Augment app allows designers to scan content and import it for AR applications. Let’s say you’re at a plumbing supply house and you find a beautiful but very large chef’s faucet, and you’re not sure if it’ll fit in your client’s design. Using the built-in AR camera, you can shoot the image and then save it. Back at the project, you can upload it into an AR app and superimpose it in the real world to check scale. You can add text and save the composite image to your files, and you can share it in real time with everyone involved in making the decision.

-   Measure. Measure will be released by Apple this fall as part of iOS 12, and it may become the new standard for measuring in the world of design and construction. Apple, with iOS 12 and Measure, has made jobsite measuring so much easier, and at the same time its AR capabilities will be especially useful to designers. Will Measure replace the tape measure and become the standard for measuring in the construction industry? Maybe. Its superpowers are that you will be able to measure almost anything with your iPhone. Point, measure and save real-world, real-time images and related data. It will even measure a person. It’s going to be easy to measure LxWxH  on your iPhone, as it will recognize rectangles automatically and measure all sides of the rectangle at once. One of the biggest assets for designers using this new app will be something that Apple calls “Level.” Designers and builders will be able to keep objects level in any space using this feature from the app.

-   Chalk. With the Chalk App, remote teamwork and collaboration become better and easier. You’ll be able to take a real-world image of an item that has just been installed at your project and superimpose a virtual image on top of it to share with your team – even on numerous different devices. Virtual images, like a manufacturer’s CAD image of a faucet, can be superimposed in the real world to create a composite and perfectly scaled image. The composite image can then be saved and revisited later by the whole team with the virtual elements still in place. This is called “Persistent AR.” The Chalk app is coming out this fall and will be an awesome new tool in a designer’s bag of tricks. It will be helpful in online meetings and for troubleshooting, and it’s an excellent way to collaborate remotely.

AR isn’t new, but the democratization of it is definitely new because Apple just made it mainstream with ARKit and ARKit 2. Design tools that were once too expensive for independent small and medium business to purchase are now free. The power to merge the real world with imagination is a superpower that designers down through the ages would have died for.